However, in the European dubbed version, the original end card shakes, and the Turner disclaimer fades up at the end. These shorts have not been officially broadcast on television since 1968 and have only been exhibited once theatrically by Warner Bros. in Spring 2010 (see below for more details) since their withdrawal. The 1948 end cards had slight color corrections and different font corrections, see below. (1540), T-shirts, Tops & Shirts It was the first from Warner Bros. to feature the pre-1948 Warner cartoon library on the same tapes as post-48 cartoons (since Turner and Time Warner merged in 1996). The ban has been continued by UA and the successive owners of the pre-August 1948 Looney Tunes / Merrie Melodies. "The Bear's Tale" had its Blue Ribbon reissue title restored, which was hacked off when its copyright were sold. THIS VERSION (C) 1998 WARNER BROS. dubbed disclaimer on the original ending card, seen on this batch of 1998 dubbed version prints. American distribution rights to Most of the Hammer Film Productions library Animation's cartoon shows (albeit with a short Merrie Melodies fanfare), except for "From Hare To Eternity" and "Superior Duck" VHS tapes, as both tapes use complete theatrical prints of their respective titular shorts which contained Warner Bros. Family Entertainment theatrical opening logos intact as the first cartoons in each tape). prints preceding them. Warner Bros. has had controversy over, among others, Turner Entertainment's "dubbed version" prints, used on every pre-1948 cartoon in circulation beginning in 1995. Cartoon Network/Boomerang's rights to televise the Warner-Brothers-owned post-1948 Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies cartoon package expired at the end of 2005, and no new broadcast agreement was reached between Cartoon Network and Warner Brothers for the post-1948 cartoons. "Back Alley Oproar", "The Penguin Parade", "Birdy and the Beast" and "What's Cookin' Doc?" These versions were actually new ones derived (hence the "dubbed" moniker) from earlier-generation prints of whatever versions of shorts were available in the Turner vaults at the time, even if they were the altered "blue ribbon" prints or oldest a.a.p. Each tape in this series began with a short version of the "Warner Bros. Family Entertainment" logo as seen on Warner Bros. ** total_quantity ** | ** unit_price ** / ** unit_measure **, T-shirts, Tops & Shirts Though some have been found, others remain this way. In addition, some European and American foreign tracks have different ending music, but their English American/European counterparts, respectively, do not. Prototype-Turner prints have the same color corrections as the official dubbed versions, but do not have the dubbed ending card or altered ending music cue rather, they have the regular end card and the original ending music cue intact. The 1948 end cards had slight color corrections and different font corrections, see below. Invite customers to join your mailing list. Unlike the THIS VERSION 1998 print compilations which succeed this Bugs and Friends tapes, a small selection of the lesser-known Depatie-Freleng era cartoons of the mid-1960s were given THIS VERSION 1997 WB dubbed prints. Use this section to welcome customers to your store, say a bit about your brand, or share news and seasonal promotions. Today, Warner Home Video holds the video rights to the entire Looney Tunes/Merrie Melodies animated output by virtue of WB's ownership of Turner Entertainment—this is why their Looney Tunes Golden Collection DVD box sets include cartoons from both the pre-8/48 Turner-owned and post-7/48 WB owned periods. The ones released on the Golden Collection are bonuses as well, although some post-1948 versions are restored. Though comic rabbits first appeared in animated shorts by Leon Schlesinger Productions in 1938 and ’39, it wasn’t until Tex Avery’s A Wild Hare (1940) that Bugs Bunny finally arrived on the big screen in a form that’s close to the character as we know him today. Speaking about this, there are many pre-1948 Looney Tunes cartoons which have both the US and EU dubbed prints look completely identical to each other, in terms of both audio and visual (from having the same color correction to having the same audio (especially end tracks, regardless of original or altered end cues), title sequence, even having the same dubbed end card). All dubbed prints here exist uncut except "Wideo Wabbit". These versions were actually new ones derived (hence the "dubbed" moniker) from earlier-generation prints of whatever versions of shorts were available in the Turner vaults at the time, even if they were the altered "blue ribbon" prints or oldest a.a.p.prints. These dubbed version transfers, unlike the older transfers pr… Taken from "Catty Cornered" (1953). They got all the color Merrie Melodies and Looney Tunes made up until July 24, 1948 ("Haredevil Hare" being the latest cartoon they got) and the black-and-white Harman-Ising Merrie Melodies (except for 1931's "Lady Play Your Mandolin", for reasons unknown). In addition to the 1995 Turner prints, Warner Bros. created new transfers from 1997-98 featuring select cartoons, labeling them as "THIS VERSION". It is unknown which cartoon this was sourced from. Now if anyone has a copy of any of the computer-colorized Looney Tunes shorts or colorized pre-1934 Harman-Ising Merrie Melodies shorts (those are quite a rarity around her) that are yet to be found, just PM me. are among examples of 1995 dubbed version prints that benefited with better quality soundtracks in comparison to their older a.a.p. This section of Misce-Looney-Ous serves as a definitive guide to the Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies shorts that reused animation from earlier films. The VHS tapes here are released in Europe and are not available in the United States. Tex Avery gets a side devoted to his early shorts, before his distinctive trademark zaniness came to be. This is perhaps because when the 1995 dubbed versions were created, the 16mm duplicate film negatives (based on what was available in the Turner vaults at the time) were re-scanned, and modern film scanning technology of the 1990s had enabled more picture exposure than previous film scanning technology. Also, "Pop Goes Your Heart" had its original opening titles restored, which was hacked off when its copyright were sold. opening music intact), "Along Came Daffy" and "Odor-able Kitty". 3 Answers. THIS VERSION (C) 1997 WARNER BROS. dubbed disclaimer on the original ending card, seen on 1997 dubbed version prints. (NOTE: "Duck Dodgers and the Return of the 24½th Century" is presented as an edited-for-TV version, hence all copies of the cartoon only exist edited). These "dubbed versions" had many alterations. Five tapes were released in this batch. Looney Tunes Wiki is a FANDOM TV Community. The "dubbed" prints also had a disclaiming copyright to Turner, and Warner Bros., thus replacing the original end card or original Blue Ribbon end card, although a few dubbed version cartoons such as "Good Night Elmer" and "Peck Up Your Troubles" do not have altered end cards for either the American or European dubbed because the cartoons don't have any dialogue. Very often, despite the enlarged picture, the 1995 dubbed versions rarely-to-never show any visible frames at any part of the edges of the screen from start to end, unlike the oldest a.a.p. "Yankee Doodle Daffy", "Daffy Duck in Hollywood", "Rhapsody in Rivets" and "Page Miss Glory" are among the 1995 dubbed version prints that benefited this full wide viewing advantage. In addition, the American dubbed transfer of "Tortoise Wins by a Hare" has the 1948 end card instead of the 1938 one. DUBBED VERSION (C) 1994 TURNER ENTERTAINMENT CO. dubbed disclaimer on the original ending card, seen on this Taken from "One Meat Brawl" (1946). All dubbed prints here exist uncut. Most of the cartoons that were reissued without the original title card and credits would end up in the pre-August 1948 package of cartoons sold to Associated Artists Productions (a.a.p. The contents in these tapes are the same as the Bugs and Friends Japanese LaserDisc set. This article or section does not cite any sources. ), (NOTE: "Scaredy Cat" has its original titles restored for the 1998 "THIS VERSION".). A comparison image depicting how 1995 dubbed version prints (right) show more picture than their previous old a.a.p. Most always kept their original opening cards, except "Daffy Duck & Egghead" and "The Night Watchman", but some of the cartoons had red, purple, green, or other color borders in the opening titles. 3 years ago. While their NTSC versions (which are often rare in availability) present the "THIS VERSION" prints in normal-pitched audio and NTSC playback speed, their PAL versions however for some reason present the "THIS VERSION" prints in normal-pitched audio instead of high-pitched audio despite playing at PAL playback speed. In almost all cases, the original ending music was kept, although sometimes, an earlier or later version of the closing theme is heard on the titles (some reissued Looney Tunes had their ending music changed to that of the Merrie Melodies series). The 1948 ending card was sourced from ". ending card from the a.a.p. "Released by Warner Bros. Pictures Inc." is digitally removed. These are only available in standard definition, so some of them had to be restored again in high definition for the Looney Tunes Platinum Collection Blu-Rays. VCD (Video CD) versions of these tapes are said to exist in some countries outside the United States. To understand the madness of this, a more-than-brief history lesson is in order.